Mass coral spawning: Restoring damaged coral reefs

Mass Coral Spawning: Restoring damaged coral reefs

Coral reef ecosystems cover only less than one percent of the world’s ocean area, yet they are home to about 25 percent of all marine species. Furthermore, the ecosystem services they provide annually—shoreline protection, fisheries, and tourism—reaches roughly $375 billion.


Coral reef destruction

Sixteen percent of corals died in the first global bleaching event that occurred in 1998. The setback spiralled dramatically between 2015 and 2016—an extended El Nino triggered the world’s most widespread bleaching ever. The third global bleaching event, unfortunately, still continues today even after El Nino ended.

Mass Coral Spawning: Restoring damaged coral reefs


Villains of the reefs

Even the slightest human touch can slaughter an entire colony of corals. Oils and other chemicals from our skin can disturb the protective mucous membrane that shields them from diseases. Scientists also pointed out that main factors in coral reef decline such as pollution, climate change, and reef infestations must be given a solution.

Mass Coral Spawning: Restoring damaged coral reefs


New hope: Mass coral spawning

About 30 years ago, the phenomenon of “sex on the reef—the mass spawning of corals,” was discovered. This discovery is the foundation of a project that may successfully re-establish the population of corals. This project aims to accelerate the formation of new coral colonies. It is now being done in small areas in the Great Barrier Reef. The process involves attaching coral larvae directly on the reef (breeding and application of coral larvae) in the hope that they grow. This method, also called coral gardening, gives new hope in combating the widespread destruction of the coral reef ecosystems.

Mass Coral Spawning: Restoring damaged coral reefs


 

Gearing Up for Deep Diving

Gearing-Up-for-Deep-Diving

Deep diving is both an exciting, and extremely tedious activity. Fortunately, it is relatively safe when you are properly trained and equipped with the right equipment. With this demanding dive activity, it is essential to meticulously prepare everything—especially your gears.


1. High-performance regulator

Regular maintenance is significant in preserving the quality performance of your regulator. The flow characteristic of your regulator degrades through frequent use, improper storage, and even over-sitting in dive bag. Have your regulator serviced regularly.

Gearing Up for Deep Diving


2. Alternate air source

Make sure you and your buddy’s octopus is high-performance. Running out of air in the middle of the dive is a sure problem. Research and ask dive professionals on which octopus is the best for deeper dives.

Gearing Up for Deep Diving


3. Dive computer

Get one if you still do not have one. A dive computer is an essential gear especially in deep diving. Get a reliable dive watch—one that can accurately predict your nitrogen loading over several multilevel dives.

Gearing Up for Deep Diving


4. Submersible pressure gauge

You do have one, don’t you? Have it checked before you dive deep.

Gearing Up for Deep Diving


5. Surface Marking Device

This will save you in case you surface far from the boat because of strong currents. Choose a Surface Marker Buoy with a striking color or reflector.

Gearing Up for Deep Diving


 

Equipment Necessary for Wreck Diving

Gears Necessary for Wreck Diving

Penetrating a wreck is one of the few underwater activities that require an additional certification: the overhead environment adds an extra level of risk. Apart from proper training, bringing the right gears is also necessary in successfully diving a wreck site.


Dive reel

The basics of using a reel may be familiar to you if you are recently trained. You need a more robusts reel in wreck diving than the one you use for your Delayed Surface Marker Buoy (DSMB). DSMBs that use finger reels do deploy. However, while you are within a wreckt, these can be prone to tangling. A ratchet-style reel is a better option as it is less likely to tangle while it is being unwound. Also, these kind of reels are much easier to retrieve and less likely to jam.

Gears Necessary for Wreck Diving


Dive torches

Diving a wreck has the same concerns as doing a night dive. Wreck diving is limited to the light zone—light is necessary for safe navigation. The rule: bring one primary light and a secondary light. If the primary dies, use the secondary torch and immediately abort mission. A torch with a wide beam is generally recommended. The dive torches must also be easy to grip.

Gears Necessary for Wreck Diving


Abrasion protection

You should definitely wear a rashguard or a wetsuit  when penetrating a wreck—even when you are diving in warmer waters. Sharp edges may be present inside the wreck, so a proper garb is needed to protect you from cuts or scrapes. Dive gloves are also a necessity—while the “do not touch” rule should apply, this is not always possible since some wrecks are tedious to explore.

Gears Necessary for Wreck Diving


Cutting Tool

A cutting tool will easily free you up in case of an entanglement—lines and cables within the wreck can easily snag you. Remember: the perfect dive knife is easy to handle and quick to release.

Gears Necessary for Wreck Diving


 

Cave Diving: How to prepare oneself?

Cave Diving: How to prepare oneself?

People say the age of exploration has gone and passed. These people have yet to discover cave diving. Cave diving at first may seem to be an impossible feat. It’s requires commitment, training and gear wise. If you take the following into consideration, the Herculean task would be a possible feat:


Cave Diving Stress

It is vital to be in a state of calmness when in possibly stressful situations like your dive missions. This is true as there is no way for a diver in panic to ascent immediately. Drills are performed during sessions from the SSI Cave Diving in order for divers understand and react in stressful situations such as running out of air, losing a buddy or a gear malfunction. Cave Dives should take any training very seriously and put it into practice until the trainee feels comfortable with solving the drills. This is to avoid panic and unpleasant events underwater.

Cave Diving: How to prepare oneself?


Previous Scuba Training

Doubles tanks and rebreathers are often used by cave diver. It is must to have previous experience with either technique before you attempting your cave dive mission. A diver should also have buoyancy control as well as familiar with propulsion techniques such as the helicopter turn, frog kick and etc. Improper techniques would lead up to stirring up the silt lessening or losing one’s visibility. For open water dives, it is easier to gain visibility by swimming to other directions if the silt has been stirred. As for cave dives, the silt will stay in suspension for a while due to reduced water flow.

Cave Diving: How to prepare oneself?


Cave Diving Equipment

Handling of scuba gear and techniques are also a key to a safe and successful cave dive. It is well-advised to have all the essential gear before starting in order to get used to using your own equipment. If uncertainty still lingers of you’ll like cave diving, one could opt to renting instead of purchasing as a kit is not inexpensive. With all those in mind, cave dive training should be continued as regular exposure could enhance your skills and lessen risks and danger during your dive missions. Although the recreational activity is not for everybody, one could improve their propulsion techniques, trim and their ability to handle tough situations. The Cave Diving experience will give you those advantages and help you stay on top of your game.

Cave Diving: How to prepare oneself?